The Lexile Level is used to measure the student’s reading ability and how difficult a text is. It starts with beginning reader (BR), which includes texts that are below 0L. The child’s Lexile level can go up to 2000L. For example, if a student receives a 320L, that score is the measure of his/her readability level. The higher the Lexile level, the higher the student’s reading level. I want to remind you that the Lexile level doesn’t correlate to the grade level.

You can receive your child’s Lexile Level in a few ways: the school can give it to you from a standardized assessment, or you can pull their level from a reading test. Read Theory (click here) is a reputable and excellent resource that I use to determine a student’s Lexile Level.

Please take a look at the Lexile Level ranges for College and Career.  Again, the grade does not correlate to the Lexile Level.

Grade   College and Career Ready Ranges*
1 190L to 530L
2 420L to 650L
3 520L to 820L
4 740L to 940L
5 830L to 1010L
6 925L to 1070L
7 970L to 1120L
8 1010L to 1185L
9 1050L to 1260L
10 1080L to 1335L
11 & 12 1185L to 1385L

Now that you know your child’s Lexile level, it’s also important to understand how to determine if a book is in your child’s Lexile range.  You can visit the website Lexile.com to find this information. This website measures the complexity of the text. In order to determine the level, it looks at the sentence length and word frequency. It does not measure lists, recipes, poetry and or song lyrics.

FYI:

I don’t want you to look at a book and think that it’s not enough pages or that there are too many pages in the book for your child.  The thickness of the book and the number of pages does not determine the level of the book.  Remember, it’s all about the sentence length, number of words, and the complexity of the book.  Look at the examples below.

 

 

I hope this helps. If you have any more questions, please email me at educatespeak@gmail.com.

Extra resource:

Click Here

Educationally Speaking,

 

CEO Ty

educationallyspeaking.net

 

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